Walk This Way: Acting Happy Can Make It So Reply

Uplifting Actions: Short bursts of exercise, putting a bounce in your step and talking to strangers can brighten your outlook. LINZIE HUNTER

Uplifting Actions: Short bursts of exercise, putting a bounce in your step and talking to strangers can brighten your outlook. LINZIE HUNTER

Research Shows People Can Improve Their Mood With Small Changes in Behavior

By Sumathi Reddy, Wall Street Journal

Sumathi.Reddy@wsj.com

Happy people walk differently than others, and scientists are finding that putting on a happy walk may give your mood a boost.

Research shows people’s mood affects how they walk. When people are happy, they tend to walk faster and more upright, swing their arms and move up and down more, and sway less side to side than sad or depressed people.

A recent study found that deliberately walking like a happy person can lift one’s spirits. And adopting the gait of a depressed person can bring on sadness. Scientists behind the study, which was published online in the Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry in September, hope to determine if a small change in outward behavior like how we walk could work in a clinical setting to help treat depression.

“There is a mutual influence between mood and body and movement,” said Johannes Michalak, a professor in the department of psychology and psychotherapy at Germany’s Witten Herdecke University and first author of the study. “There might be specific types of movements that are specific characteristics of depression and this feeds the lower mood. So it’s a vicious cycle,” he said.

A range of studies have found many little ways we can improve our mood, from talking to strangers to arranging a match between friends. Even abstaining from temptations such as chocolate can help boost our state of relative happiness by helping us appreciate experiences that are repeated in everyday life.

“There are these little doses of social interactions that are available in our day” that can brighten our mood and create a sense of belonging. “I don’t think people recognize this,” said Elizabeth Dunn, an associate psychology professor at the University of British Columbia, who co-authored a study last year of customers’ interactions with Starbucks baristas.

In the walking study, researchers at Queen’s University in Canada, working with the research team in Germany, had 39 undergraduate students walk on a treadmill at a steady pace while watching an interactive gauge displayed on a monitor in front of them.

The students were told to attempt different ways of walking until through trial and error they were able to move the gauge to the right. Moving the gauge to the right meant walking in a depressed manner for half the participants, and in a happy manner for the other half. They weren’t told what the gauge was measuring.

Article continues here:  Behavior Modification Made Easy

 

 

 

Carl Honoré: In Praise of Slowness Reply

Journalist Carl Honoré believes the Western world’s emphasis on speed erodes health, productivity and quality of life. But there’s a backlash brewing, as everyday people start putting the brakes on their all-too-modern lives. Honoré is best known for his advocacy of the Slow Movement. His book “In Praise of Slowness” dissects our speed-obsessed society and celebrates those who have gotten in touch with their “inner tortoise.”